Sentinel-3

EUMETSAT to provide integrated marine data stream

EUMETSAT User Relations Manager Sally Wannop explains how Sentinel-3 data will be disseminated as part of a multi-mission, integrated data stream in support of operational oceanography

When Sentinel-3’s marine mission is fully operational, its new, more advanced instruments will be sending back to Earth high quality data in vastly increased amounts.

This data, so important for increasing our knowledge about the Earth’s oceans and seas, will be processed and disseminated to users by EUMETSAT.

EUMETSAT’s goal is to offer service providers and users a multi-mission data stream, combining the data from Sentinel-3’s instruments with those already being delivered by the organisation in support of operational oceanography, EUMETSAT User Relations Manager Sally Wannop said.

"In terms of delivery of data to users, we are multi-mission focussed and the new Copernicus services will be delivered in a similar way"

“I’ve had many years’ experience working with EUMETSAT’s Member States but this is a new aspect, with new customers,” Wannop said.

“In terms of delivery of data to users, we are multi-mission focussed and the new Copernicus services will be delivered in a similar way.”

The Sentinel-3 data and products would be delivered through EUMETSAT’s existing dissemination channels, thereby making available the broadest possible range of opportunities to users.

EUMETSAT will deliver its marine data stream to the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) and ultimately provide all service providers and users in the EU and EUMETSAT Member States equal access.

CMEMS focuses on providing users with data relating to four key application areas: marine resources; maritime safety; coastal and marine environment and climate monitoring.

CMEMS already uses Near Real Time and reprocessed data delivered by EUMETSAT from its Metop and Meteosat satellites, as well as the Jason-2 joint European and American ocean-monitoring satellite and this will be built upon by data from Sentinel-3, Jason-3, Sentinel-6 and Jason-CS.

EUMETSAT will use and build on its existing dissemination infrastructure to provide its marine data stream, Wannop said.

The organisation’s primary dissemination mechanism for near real-time delivery of satellite data and products is the EUMETCast satellite service, a cost-effective system based on standard Digital Video Broadcast technology. 

In addition, Sentinel-3 marine data and products would be available over the Internet through On-Line Data Access (ODA) and through the new EUMETCast Terrestrial Demonstration Service and EUMETView, the organisation’s web map service. Historical Sentinel-3 data would be ordered through the Data Centre.

"Sentinel-3 will be the first service to use the high volume EUMETCast satellite service which was introduced in Europe with DVB-S2. "

“Users need to prepare to receive this data,” Wannop said.  “Sentinel-3 will be the first service to use the high volume EUMETCast satellite service which was introduced in Europe with DVB-S2.  Users will need to ensure they have the capacity to receive and process the data.”

Another innovation available for the Sentinel-3 marine data stream’s dissemination is the EUMETCast Terrestrial Demonstration service.

EUMETCast Terrestrial functions like the satellite service, but using a terrestrial network instead of a satellite network. The DVB satellite link is replaced by a connection to a national research network.

The DVB reception device and antenna front end is replaced by a network cable connection.  The EUMETCast Terrestrial service has the potential to reach users beyond the EUMETCast satellite footprint - in Australia, for example. 

As part of EUMETSAT’s services to users, there is a responsibility to disseminate data to international users – and international partners’ users, for example in the US, Australia and Africa - as already occurs with the US’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). 

Wannop said EUMETSAT was also exploring the possibility of making data visually available via EUMETView.  This will help users who need to have a quick look at the data and products so they can select what they need.

Users will be able to see products that relate to wave height, sea surface temperature and algal blooms.

Wannop is a member of the Operations Preparation Integrated Team at EUMETSAT, representing user data access.  Working with new customers has been one of the most interesting aspects of her work on the Copernicus programme.
 

Last Updated:  Wednesday, 10 February 2016