Sand storm

Large dust squall over Niger, Mali & Algeria

9 June 00:00–10 June 10:00 UTC

Sand storm
Sand storm

On 9 June, convection lifts part of the low-lying dust higher up — above the boundary layer — where westerly winds carry it back in an easterly direction.

Last Updated

13 June 2022

Published on

09 June 2010

By Jochen Kerkmann and HansPeter Roesli (EUMETSAT)

This spectacular MSG Dust RGB sequence (Figure 1) shows a large dust squall over Niger, Mali and southern Algeria, triggered by a thunderstorm system visible in the lower part of the images, that travelled hundreds of kilometers westwards over the Sahara. This shows how long a distance strong dust squalls can propagate and how well defined they can be at night.

Figure 1: Meteosat-9 Dust RGB, 9 June 00:00–10 June 10:00 UTC

On 9 June, daytime convection lifted part of the low-lying dust higher up — above the boundary layer — where westerly winds carried it back in an easterly direction. The higher level dust can be seen very well in the late afternoon and night hours by its bright magenta colour (as compared to the dark magenta colour of the low-level dust squall). Note that, towards the end of the animation, the westward propagation of the dust squall slows down as it approaches a deformation zone.

Dust RGB
Figure 2: Meteosat-9, 10 June 2010 00:00 UTC. Animation 1 (9 June 00:00–12:00 UTC)