Solar eclipse shadow over the Pacific

Solar eclipse shadow over the Pacific

09 March 2016 00:00–03:00 UTC

Solar eclipse shadow over the Pacific
Solar eclipse shadow over the Pacific

The shadow caused by a total solar eclipse on 9 March was seen by the Himawari-8 satellite.

Last Updated

09 August 2021

Published on

08 March 2016

By Jochen Kerkmann

Millions saw the total solar eclipse over the Pacific and Indonesia. The eclipse began at 23:19 UTC (06:19 local time) on Tuesday 9 March, as the Moon started to pass directly in front of the Sun.

Totality began at 00:15 UTC, with the moment of maximum totality at 01:59 UTC. The eclipse ended north of Hawaii at 04:34 UTC. Graphic of totality (Credit: NASA)

Figure 1 is the Himwari-8 imagery of the shadow as it was over Indonesia at 01:00 UTC. Interestingly, the shadow of the Moon is much better seen in band 1 (VIS0.4) than in band 4 (VIS0.8). There are not many land surfaces on which to see the shadow, so a band that is sensitive to aerosols and haze is more appropriate for detecting the shadow on this occasion.

Image comparison

Himawari-8 VIS0.4, band 1 compare1
compare2
 

Figure 1: Comparison of Himawari-8, where the solar eclipse shadow shows better on the VIS0.4 image.

In the animation of the VIS0.4 imagery, from 9 March 00:00–03:00 UTC (Figure 2) the shadow moves from western Indonesia, across the southern Marshall Islands towards the Hawaiian Islands.

It is interesting to see how the shadow of the Moon and the sunglint area move in almost opposite directions.

 
 Animated gif of Himawari-8 VIS0.4, 9 March 00:00–03:00 UTC
Figure 2: Himawari-8 VIS0.4, 9 March 00:00–03:00 UTC
 

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