Twin cyclone Eunice and Diamondra

Twin tropical storms Eunice and Diamondra

26 January 2015 00:00 UTC–1 February 18:00 UTC

Twin cyclone Eunice and Diamondra
Twin cyclone Eunice and Diamondra

At the end of January, a few days after the tropical cyclone twins Bansi and Chedza, another pair of tropical depressions developed in the Southern Indian Ocean.

Last Updated

09 November 2020

Published on

25 January 2015

Diamondra started on 26 January, but never reached tropical cyclone status and dissolved during 28 February.

One day after Diamondra formed, tropical depression Eunice developed in the west, north of Rodrigues island, part of the Mascarene Islands.

Meteosat-7 infrared image of the twin tropical storms, 28 January 15:00 UTC
Figure 1: Meteosat-7 infrared image of the twin tropical storms, 28 January 15:00 UTC

The Meteosat-7 infrared animation, 28 January 00:00 UTC–1 February 18:00 UTC, follows Eunice and Diamondra during the seven days where they stayed very close together. Eunice's well-structured eye can be clearly seen.

The outflow from the storm tops was also spectacular, marked by spiralling cirrus bands.

Download animation, 28 January 00:00 UTC–1 February 18:00 UTC

 
Metop-B IR10.8 with ASCAT winds overlaid, 30 January 17:21 UTC
Figure 2: Metop-B IR10.8 with ASCAT winds overlaid, 30 January 17:21 UTC
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Eunice rapidly evolved into a tropical cyclone and intensified further into a category-5 storm on 30 January. Eunice became the fourth tropical cyclone of the 2015 Southern Indian Ocean season.

The combination of AVHRR channel IR10.8 and the wind field from ASCAT on Metop-B shows the cloud and wind patterns, as well as her spatial extension close to the time of her maximum intensity.

After reaching maximum sustained wind speeds of around 260 kph, Eunice started to weaken on 1 February.

 

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Composite image from EUMETSAT and JMA satellites (Flickr)
Eunice (Southern Indian Ocean) (NASA)
Tropical Cyclone Eunice Reaches Category 5 Status (The Weather Channel)
Real-time storm coverage (SSEC, University of Wisconsin-Madison)