Severe convective storm with radial Ci clouds over Cyprus

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Severe convective storm with radial Ci clouds over Cyprus.

Date & Time
13 October 2006 00:00 UTC
Satellites
Meteosat-8, NOAA

More information and detailed analysis of the feature can be found in the In Depth section.

 

In Depth

by Jochen Kerkmann, HansPeter Roesli, Anna Eronn (EUMETSAT) and Stelios Pashiardis (Meteorological Service, Nicosia, Cyprus)

Jump to images

The Meteosat-8 images below show a case of severe convection over the Eastern Mediterranean. On this day (13 October 2006), western Cyprus reported thundery showers associated with strong winds and hail (size of walnut) and total precipitation (24 hours) of 70.0 mm (Pegia), 74.0 mm (Mavrokolymbos) and 68.0 mm (Ayios Neophytos).

The upper left image shows three major convective systems over and around Cyprus identified by cold cloud tops in this IR10.8 image. The most interesting feature in this infrared image is the cold-U shape of the storm over western Cyprus, which is a typical satellite indicator of severe convective storms (see also Mesoscale Convective System hits Genoa, Liguria, 28 July 2006).

Other indicators for severe storms are the overshooting tops and the above-anvil plume seen in the high-resolution visible (HRV) image (uper right). In addition, thanks to the relatively large viewing angle and the low sun elevation, the vertical structure of the various parts (base, tower, anvil) of the Cb clouds is revealed (see RGB HRV, HRV, IR10.8 close-up look, JPG, 248 KB).

Both images also show fibre-like cirrus clouds on the northern and eastern side of the convective storms, which seem to radiate out from the fringes of the anvils. The cause of these radial cirrus clouds is not exactly known. Certainly it indicates a strong upper-level divergence, as in the case of Hurricane Isabel (see last link under 'See also'). The regular spacing of the cloud streaks evokes a sense of wave-related motion, but it is unclear which type of wave could be responsible for this phenomenon (gravity waves?).

 

Meteosat-8 Images

Met-8, 13 October 2006, 06:45 UTC
Channel 09 (IR10.8)
Full Resolution (JPG, 176 KB)
Animation (04:00–09:00 UTC, MP4, 854 KB)
Met-8, 13 October 2006, 06:45 UTC
Channel 09 (IR10.8)
Full Resolution (JPG, 178 KB)
Interpretation (JPG, 123 KB)

See also:

HRV image, 13 October 2006, 7:00 UTC
(PNG, 197 KB, source: HP. Roesli)
HRV image, 13 October 2006, 7:45 UTC
(PNG, 197 KB, source: HP. Roesli)
RGB composite VIS0.8, IR3.9r, IR10.8
(13 October, 06:45 UTC, JPG, 530 KB)
RGB composite WV6.2–WV7.3, IR3.9–IR10.8, NIR1.6–VIS0.6
(13 October, 06:45 UTC, JPG, 425 KB)
RGB composite HRV, HRV, IR10.8
(13 October, 06:45 UTC, JPG, 406 KB)
Severe convective storm with radial Cirrus over France
(Met-8, 28 June 2005, 19:15 UTC, HRV, JPG, 274 KB, source: M. Setvak)
Convective storm with radial Cirrus over Italy
(NOAA-6 AVHRR, 17 July 1982, 08:00 UTC, VIS0.8, JPG, 321 KB, source: M. Setvak)
Convective storm with radial Cirrus over Italy
(NOAA-6 AVHRR, 17 July 1982, 08:00 UTC, RGB 01-02-04, JPG, 363 KB, source: M. Setvak)
Radial Cirrus produced by Hurricane Isabel
(Met-8, 10 September 2003, 06:00–18:00 UTC, IR10.8, AVI, 3 MB, source: J. Kerkmann)

 
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